East Africa Food Crisis – Response

Self Help AfricaAgriculture & Nutrition, Climate Change, Ethiopia, Featured, Kenya, Malawi, News

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Vital seed and other equipment is being distributed to families in Kenya and Ethiopia, as Self Help Africa responds to the terrible food crisis that is gripping East Africa.

We are distributing seed for a number of nutrient rich crops to more than 4,500 households in Kenya, while thousands more in Ethiopia are receiving seed NOW – so that they are ready to plant when the seasonal rains arrive in a few weeks times.

With your help we will do much more.

East Africa is currently facing its worst food crisis in generations, with approximately 20 million people in urgent need of help in Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan and Somalia.

Although our current intervention does not address the immediate priority – which sees the United Nations and other agencies providing emergency food supplies to affected communities –it is vital that rural poor families receive planting materials, so that in 3-4 months time their fields will be producing the food they will need for the rest of this year, and into the future.

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    IN KENYA

    Green gram and pigeon pea seed being provided will give thousands of households in the drought affected Kilifi district a 10 months supply of highly nutritious food

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    IN ETHIOPIA

    Drought tolerant cereal seed, fertilizer, farm tools and draught animals are being provided in Amhara and Oromia regions, so that families are equipped and ready to plant when the seasonal (Meher) rains arrive, in a little over a month’s time

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    IN MALAWI

    Thousands of households are being helped to combat a devastating invasion by Fall Armyworm which is destroying maize and other cereal crops across the region.


Fighting Food Crisis

Your support is needed in combatting the world’s largest humanitarian crisis.


*Reports from Ethiopia show that households provided with drought tolerant seed varieties by Self Help Africa had harvested 50% of their normal food crop, as compared to an almost complete crop failure experienced by others in the region.